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The first iPhone was released less than 10 years ago. Can we even imagine a life without the touchscreen technology, app stores and constant checking of our phones? Well, maybe we wish there the checking could happen less constantly. Yet the fact is, technology is here to stay and we continue to be enthralled by it — just as we are enthusiastic about the best stories of the week. Enjoy.

Ever wondered what consumers think about chip cards and mobile payments? Well, you might not like it. There’s a sales pitch by Square at the end of this information. Still, it’s good data.

Did you know that a demographic tidal wave is coming? “We are arriving at ‘peak youth’ for the first time in human history, while the number of persons aged 65+ is expected to outnumber children under 5 by the end of this decade.” The consequences will be game-changing.

How do you master the power of designing products for customers you don’t have yet? “Getting innovation right doesn’t have to be a crapshoot. When you deeply explore what consumers are actually trying to achieve, opportunity may appear where none seemed possible. With that shift in perspective, you can often predict, confidently, what products or services consumers are likely to hire to accomplish their job to be done.”

What it feels like to be the last generation to remember life before the Internet: “When you wake up, you have this gift of a blank brain. You could fill it with anything. But for most of us, we have this kind of panic. Instead of wondering what should I do, we wonder what did I miss. It’s almost like our consciousness is a kind of failure and we can’t believe we’ve been offline for eight hours.”

What every institutional innovation program gets wrong: “Optimization is relentless. Inventing is hard. Scaling is even harder.”

We love this: How to listen when you disagree. “It takes a lot of forgiveness, compassion, patience, and courage to listen in the face of disagreement. I could write pages on each of these principles, but let’s start with the one thing that makes forgiveness, compassion, patience, and courage possible. We must work to hear the person, not just the opinion.”