Triggers: Creating Behavior That Lasts – Becoming the Person You Want to Be

Summary

To be prepared for the challenge of life, one can either practice relentless discipline or approach the world with a combination of charm and resourcefulness. Marshall Goldsmith found a way to be be resourceful when it comes to both approaches. That’s why he’s such an invaluable guide for leaders who want to improve their impact. He is a clever and cheerful teacher who knows how to love life. But he’s also one of the most disciplined people you are ever likely to learn about. His latest book, Triggers: Creating Behavior That Lasts — Becoming the Person You Want to Be, coauthored with Mark Reiter, is an important guide to the use of discipline as a simultaneous source of self-control and joy.

THINK Review

Almost everybody believes that life is easier at the top. The higher you rise in an organization, the more control you have over your hourly activities. You also tend to get compensated more. But life also gets tougher. People look at you. Each mistake is visible. Only a few of those rarefied positions are available. Failure is an option but not for the ones that rise to the top. Unless you find a way to translate failure into some form of success.

To be prepared for the challenge of life, one can either practice relentless discipline or approach the world with a combination of charm and resourcefulness. Marshall Goldsmith found a way to be be resourceful when it comes to both approaches. That’s why he’s such an invaluable guide for leaders who want to improve their impact. He is a clever and cheerful teacher who knows how to love life. But he’s also one of the most disciplined people you are ever likely to learn about. His latest book, Triggers: Creating Behavior That Lasts — Becoming the Person You Want to Be, coauthored with Mark Reiter, is an important guide to the use of discipline as a simultaneous source of self-control and joy.

Asking the Same 22 Questions Every Day

Every night, Goldsmith does something odd and inspiring: He has a friend call him and ask the same 22 questions. (And, yes, they are still friends). These questions all start with the phrase, “Did I do my best today?” and they end up discussing strategies, philosophies, physical exertion and personal quests. He has done this for years and he calls the questions “triggers,” or purposefully designed environmental cues that move a person continuously in a direction of productive change. This book explains how to construct and set these triggers for yourself and overcome selfish traits.

“My mission is to help people become the person that they want to be, not tell them who that person is,” Goldsmith writes.

If you want to improve your behavior and live a life without regrets, read this book. If you want to unlock your potential to grow as a successful leader, you need to read this book.

This book equips you with self-awareness and brings out behavioral changes for becoming a better professional and leader. It contains powerful one liners, quotes and diagrams. The biggest take away from this book is: Invest in your future.

Buy the book at Amazon.com

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